Hypnotist Ronny Romm does it again

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“I went to Ronny Romm my freshman year,” senior Olivia Reynolds said. “I liked this time because the show wasn’t exactly the same. He still thought of new tricks and new ways to engage the crowd.” This year, recordings and photos were not permitted in the theater, as the night’s goal was “entertainment without embarrassment.” 

Students who wanted to experience hypnotism joined Romm onstage in Roberts Theater. Romm had these students take seats and silenced the crowd as he described a beach scene, giving the volunteers instructions for relaxation into the hypnotized state. 

Once the volunteers were hypnotized, Romm had them perform different tasks in their highly influential state. “It was very different from what I expected,” senior David Shi said about his experience as a volunteer. “I still felt very much in control, and I was still conscious, but I just really wanted to do what he said.”
The students enacted numerous performances, such as dancing to songs by the artist Beyoncé and imitating Arnold Schwarzenegger. In addition, Romm convinced the students of make-believe situations, including the idea that someone from the audience had stolen their belly button or that they were bodybuilders or betters. 

“The time really flew by too,” David said. “I thought it had only been like 15 to 20 minutes when over an hour had actually passed.” Although some students were influenced by Romm and experienced a distorted perception of time and reality, some volunteers, such as junior Kata Mesterhazy, were not effectively hypnotized. 

“Since I didn’t get hypnotized, it is hard to imagine that [the other volunteers] acted so weird and couldn’t stop themselves,” Kata said. Although it is known that mental blocks or disbelief can prevent one from experiencing hypnotism, this was not the case with Kata, who was very willing to be hypnotized. 

“It didn’t work on me, and, to be honest, I have no idea why,” she said. “I wanted to get hypnotized so badly, just for the experience. It was still a really fun experience.”  

Despite the public performances from hypnotized volunteers, it can be difficult to believe the power of hypnotism without experiencing it yourself. “I’ve been a skeptical believer before and after the event,” Olivia said. “I don’t think total mind control exists, but I do believe people can become more susceptible to suggestion.”

Whether the audience was convinced of Romm’s power or not, the show still proved to be a worthy after-school experience. “I think events like these help to bring the community closer and encourage bonding between the different grades and groups on campus,” Olivia said. “It was a lot of fun spending a Friday night with my friends on campus, and I was entertained the whole time!”

Hypnotist Ronny Romm returned to KO’s campus on Friday, Feb. 11, to entertain a crowd of students with after-school mind control. This was Mr. Romm’s third year visiting campus, yet he utilized new ideas to keep students attentive. 

“I went to Ronny Romm my freshman year,” senior Olivia Reynolds said. “I liked this time because the show wasn’t exactly the same. He still thought of new tricks and new ways to engage the crowd.” This year, recordings and photos were not permitted in the theater, as the night’s goal was “entertainment without embarrassment.” 

Students who wanted to experience hypnotism joined Romm onstage in Roberts Theater. Romm had these students take seats and silenced the crowd as he described a beach scene, giving the volunteers instructions for relaxation into the hypnotized state. 

Once the volunteers were hypnotized, Romm had them perform different tasks in their highly influential state. “It was very different from what I expected,” senior David Shi said about his experience as a volunteer. “I still felt very much in control, and I was still conscious, but I just really wanted to do what he said.”
The students enacted numerous performances, such as dancing to songs by the artist Beyoncé and imitating Arnold Schwarzenegger. In addition, Romm convinced the students of make-believe situations, including the idea that someone from the audience had stolen their belly button or that they were bodybuilders or betters. 

“The time really flew by too,” David said. “I thought it had only been like 15 to 20 minutes when over an hour had actually passed.” Although some students were influenced by Romm and experienced a distorted perception of time and reality, some volunteers, such as junior Kata Mesterhazy, were not effectively hypnotized. 

“Since I didn’t get hypnotized, it is hard to imagine that [the other volunteers] acted so weird and couldn’t stop themselves,” Kata said. Although it is known that mental blocks or disbelief can prevent one from experiencing hypnotism, this was not the case with Kata, who was very willing to be hypnotized. 

“It didn’t work on me, and, to be honest, I have no idea why,” she said. “I wanted to get hypnotized so badly, just for the experience. It was still a really fun experience.”  

Despite the public performances from hypnotized volunteers, it can be difficult to believe the power of hypnotism without experiencing it yourself. “I’ve been a skeptical believer before and after the event,” Olivia said. “I don’t think total mind control exists, but I do believe people can become more susceptible to suggestion.”

Whether the audience was convinced of Romm’s power or not, the show still proved to be a worthy after-school experience. “I think events like these help to bring the community closer and encourage bonding between the different grades and groups on campus,” Olivia said. “It was a lot of fun spending a Friday night with my friends on campus, and I was entertained the whole time!”