“The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo;” not your average romance novel

Reviews

Have you also been getting tired of the predictable romance novels? Well trust me, you will not be able to predict this one. “The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo” by Taylor Jenkins Reid is not just an ordinary love story, as it doesn’t end with the usual “they lived happily ever after.” This novel’s deeper meaning is about being able to grow into your own identity, rather than acting in a way that you are not true to yourself. I encourage you all to read “The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo” as it demonstrates the stages of life and relationships that people go through by taking the reader through many different situations and time frames.

Jenkins Reid has written several bestselling novels over the past few years. Her most popular ones include “Daisy Jones & The Six,” “Malibu Rising,” and “The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo.” After graduating college, Reid began writing in her free time. She eventually started working in education, and in 2013 she published her first book, “Forever, Interrupted.” Jenkins Reid normally writes in the fictional genre as she likes to provide the readers with relatable stories.

“The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo,” along with many other of Jenkins Reid’s novels portray very realistic characters because at least one aspect of her stories comes from something true. For this book specifically, Evelyn Hugo is modeled after Elizabeth Taylor who was famous for having been married eight times. In her novel, “The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo,” we learn about the famous actress Evelyn Hugo and the extraordinary life that she led. One engaging aspect of this book is that it is told both through Evelyn’s eyes as she lived through these events, but also through Monique, the woman that Evelyn has brought in to write her memoir. Throughout the story, one question that comes up for both us as readers, but also Monique is: Why was she asked to write about Evelyn? What connection do the two of them share? 

We start off this book learning about Evelyn and her past. Evelyn has always had to hide who she truly is so that she would have more opportunities as an actress. At the young age of 16, she was married for the first time, with her husband and the world thinking that she was 18. As the story continues, we learn more about Evelyn and her relationship, but the one question Monique wants to know is: who was her true love? Everything changes as we find out that during her time with her second husband, she had a secret and possibly even forbidden romance. 

As this book progresses, we meet many new characters, most being her romantic partners, but also those she encounters during her acting career. The main trait that stands out about Evelyn, not just to those who she meets but also to the readers, is her ability to capture your attention.This is one of the many amazing things that Jenkins Reid does in her stories. She creates these characters to be intriguing  so that you really have to think about and process what decisions they make, and also what opportunities they walk away from. 

Just as compelling as Evelyn is the character of Monique, who must learn how to put herself first in life. Evelyn has to deal with many challenging obstacles in her life, but she eventually realizes that everything happens for a reason, and she hopes that she can help Monique realize the same for herself. As the novel progresses, Evelyn continuosly gives  Monique very helpful advice. “When you’re given an opportunity to change your life, be ready to do whatever it takes to make it happen. The world doesn’t give things, you take things.” One very important message that Monique takes  away from her time with Evelyn, is that even though you may have to deal with judgment, the most important thing is to believe in yourself and remember that you always come first. 

In the end, the most fascinating parts of this book aren’t the romances, not even the forbidden ones, but rather the connection between Monique and Evelyn and the trust that they build with each other.